Signing up for Matrix Chat using Element

Noticed there is basically bug all user guides directed at the layman on the internet regarding signing up for Matrix chat using the Element chat client. Here’s a hastily cobbled together one based off the Android version of the Element App off of Google Play Store. If any other Matrix chat users want to flog this and improve it, by all means, please do so.

This guide is intended to be a very quick and dirty guide for getting prospective users who are interested to have a look at the Federated Matrix chat system signed up and started in the most direct way possible using the default reference matrix.org homeserver instance purely as a starting point only.

More privacy conscious users may wish to use a different homeserver as opposed to using matrix.org’s reference homeserver. This is one of the key benefits of the matrix protocol is that you have a choice of servers in which to establish an account on. Don’t like a particular homeserver (due to their policies)? There are many other homeservers to chose from.

Without further a do.. Steps to get started with Matrix.

Step 01: Open Google Play Sore and search for Matrix. Element Messenger should come up as one the top results… Open the App’s page and click Install. Continue reading “Signing up for Matrix Chat using Element”

Signing up for Matrix Chat using Element

Matrix chat community New Zealand

There is currently a matrix.org based chat community operating for New Zealand, originally established back in 2015 (when I was exploring and testing out alternative communication platforms to potentially draw friends and family away from the large centralized and commercialized platforms such as Facebook)

The community has grown to around 80 unique users and continues to grows every week. Click the following link to get started with [matrix] (using the currently foremost client Element).

The key benefits of Matrix over say Discord, WhatsApp, Telegam and signal is that users are able to run their run (Self-host) and govern their own homeserver for their social group (social groups, makers spaces, etc) and have it federate (talk to) other Homeservers.

Given Matrix’s federated nature, users can sign up for a account on a server of their choice or host their own. Recommended for NZ is mtrx.nz or otherwise, the main reference Matrix server instance at matrix.org (via app.element.io).

Main (Landing) space…

Individual Rooms within the Matrix New Zealand space…

There will be others, please check the #nzcom:matrix.org – New Zealand Matrix Community Space, for the latest list of New Zealand Matrix chat rooms.

Instructions to get started with Matrix (using Element.io).

Matrix chat community New Zealand

BAN 1366×768 Screens 😛

In the year 2022, Why on earth are New mid-range and better Laptops fitted with a 15.6 inch 1366×768 resolution screen still even exist?

Something tongue in cheek… In the guise of certain people in New Zealand advocating banning 1080 poison by way of “BAN 1080” signage and scrawls particularly in parts of rural New Zealand, I propose a new movement for the more tech inclined among us: BAN 1080  768, Demand 1080 (minimum)… 😛

“768” being the vertical resolution on laptops screens I’m railing against (which is not tongue in cheek). The majority, if not all laptops with a screen size of 14 inches or larger should have at least a screen resolution of 1920 x 1080. No laptop with a screen 14 inches or larger on a medium spec (AMD Ryzen 5, Intel i5) or better laptop should ever be sold new with a mere 1366 x 768 resolution screen in the year 2022. Continue reading “BAN 1366×768 Screens 😛”

BAN 1366×768 Screens 😛

Commentary: Auckland Transport’s war against the private motor car and the motoring public.

In light of Auckland Transport’s announcement regarding removing of kerbside parking, it’s probably worth highlighting Auckland Transport’s (AT’s) current ethos has effectively been to discourage car use in favour of alternative transport modes in order to achieve their various visions and goals, including…

  • To make better use of existing road space in favour of higher occupancy vehicles, which at least on the surface sound like a laudable goal. However question the current ambition to retrofit these changes at high cost and high disruption to existing neighbourhoods as opposed to working with Auckland Council to implement and promote high density development along with high capacity transit corridors to new greenfield sites such as Mill Road, Flat Bush, Papakura, Karaka, Ramarama.
  • ‘Vision Zero’ – being that… “no deaths are acceptable”, “People make mistakes (behind the wheel)”, “Public Transport is the safest option”. We’re now seeing this in the form of enforcement and the forceful dropping of speed limits to what many may feel are ridiculously low speed limits. Auckland Transport’s ‘‘marketing’ material can be found here however question whether any possible outcome would ever be as rosy as they paint it.
  • Climate change – With their parent organisation, Auckland Council, having followed other government departments to declare a “climate emergency” – encouraging a gradual move to carbon-free transport modes by way of promoting Public Transport, Cycling and Walking.

While I am certainly and staunchly in favour of developing and rolling out accessible alternative transport options in Auckland, particularly in areas currently beset with high levels of car dependency, it appears from all intents and purposes in order to achieve the aims as listed in the bullet points above, Auckland Transport have declared all out war against the private motor car and the motoring public. While I can see where AT are trying to head, they’re choosing to run roughshod over people’s current living arrangement and applying the ‘stick’ in the hope of encouraging modal shift by way of making private motor vehicle use such a hassle so much so that Auckland commuters will hopefully shift to other modes such as walking, cycling and public transport. Continue reading “Commentary: Auckland Transport’s war against the private motor car and the motoring public.”

Commentary: Auckland Transport’s war against the private motor car and the motoring public.